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Getting to grips with noise

With International Noise Awareness Day coming up on 25 April, it’s a good time to think about noise: what it is, and what we can do about it.According to the government’s Noise Policy Statement, ‘sound only becomes noise (often defined as ‘unwanted sound’) when it exists in the wrong place or at the wrong time’ causing(…)

The Monument: memorial, fossil, telescope, gnomon

The Monument – the flame-topped Doric column to the north of London Bridge – was once the capital’s tallest building. At 202ft, it’s as high as it is distant from the bakery on Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started in 1666. Visible from all around, it would have reminded anyone who looked up of(…)

Ringing the changes

First it was Big Ben – silenced in August (see London Loses Its Voice) – now, St Paul’s. So, when I led a group into the Cathedral courtyard one Sunday morning expecting them to be dazzled by the change ringing, we were greeted with … nothing.It turns out that the bells were taken down in(…)

London’s answer to plastic waste

There was a time when Londoners weren’t that fussed by water. Gin and beer were far more popular, and – dissipation and alcohol poisoning aside – safer to drink. It took the Victorian temperance movement coupled with terrible cholera epidemics for people to realise that free, potable water might be a good thing. So, in(…)

Talking about Slowing Down on Lush Radio

I was delighted to be invited by Lush cosmetics radio station to join a conversation about slowing down. It’s an explicit theme of London In Slow Motion walk. But actually the idea of slowing down – taking time to stop, look, listen and think – is key to all our walks.It was an interesting morning bouncing ideas around with Eloise King (executive producer(…)

London loses its voice

At midday on Monday Big Ben will sound its last bongs until 2021. It’s being silenced so that the clock and surrounding tower can be safely repaired. It will continue to show the correct time. But once the bell’s striking hammer is locked, the clock will lose its voice.Perhaps London, too, will lose its voice. Big Ben represents(…)

City noise and body rhythms

We tend to think of noisy places as ‘fast’ and quiet places as ‘slow’. There’s a rather obvious reason for this: motion – from cars, tube trains, hordes of commuters – usually generates noise. Other kinds of noise, though, have nothing to do with movement. A pub packed with people shouting to be heard above the music might still feel(…)

Finally on TripAdvisor!

Five years (yes, five!) since we launched, we are now FINALLY on TripAdvisor. We’re pleased as punch.So far we’ve had five wonderful reviews posted there. But we’ve got loads more on our website, amassed over the years. They give a really good flavour of what to expect.We’re always delighted to hear from people about their experiences on(…)

Crossrail: adventures in waste

There’s so much of wonder about Crossrail, the new railway under London that will link Reading and Heathrow with Shenfield and Abbey Wood when it opens in 2019. First off, there’s the staggeringly ambitious engineering work to construct 42km of tunnels through the centre of a city already riddled with holes from the tube network.The real joy for(…)

London Marches

With huge political changes happening this year, we can expect London to play an important role as a place of protest.So, on Friday there will be Stand Up To Trump protests outside the US Embassy coinciding with Trump’s inauguration. On Saturday, thousands are expected to join the Women’s March from the US embassy to Trafalgar Square: a ‘sister’ march(…)